Celebrating our nurses – Gill Quigley

Date: 01 April 2020

Gill Quigley

2020 is the International Year of the Nurse and Midwife – a chance for us to shine the light on some of the amazing nurses who make up our diverse workforce.

Here Gill Quigley, Learning Disability Nurse, tells us what she enjoys about her job.

What inspired you to become a nurse?

When I was at school in Essex as a 14/15 year old, there was a special school across the road and we were all encouraged to join them for certain things like Christmas concerts.

My school also ran a residential holiday for a week during the summer holidays. Even though I was too young to fully participate, I would go along in the evenings and join in. I loved the involvement.

Then when I was 17, I started doing some voluntary work in a nurse training hospital for people with learning disabilities and again loved this and looked forward to the times that I had there.

I had been inspired by the nurses that I had met at that hospital and following the voluntary work, I thought that the next step would be to apply for nursing degree.  

Can you please describe your typical day?

My current typical day doesn’t exist as in the past 6 months I changed the post that I have. I work as a Senior Care Coordinator in the Learning Disability and Autism Project through NCL and as a Continuing Healthcare Coordinator for the LD and ASD young people in Barnet CCG.

Variety is definitely the main thing in my current post and this is something that I love. I go to meetings, have discussions with various professionals within the Trust, in the CCG, social care, education and various providers. There are so many parts to my post that it is difficult to pinpoint what is typical.

What is the best part of your job?

Working with other people whether that is the young people, their families or other professionals and building relationships and doing something to make a change and to enhance someone else’s life is very rewarding. I love to celebrate nursing at every opportunity that there is!

What would you say to someone considering a career in nursing?

I would say “Come on in”. This is a great career and there are challenges and opportunities that are available to all.

I really believe that nursing is a vocational career and that each different part of the register is also a different vocation.

There are only 3200 Learning Disability Nurses but in this profession we can make a difference. We can help people and families to move forward in their lives, to be seen and heard, and to have the best life that they can have.

Being an advocate and ensuring that all people have access to the same care and standing up for people with a learning disability is very rewarding.

 

  • Summary:

    2020 is the International Year of the Nurse and Midwife – a chance for us to shine the light on some of the amazing nurses who make up our diverse workforce.

    Here Gill Quigley, Learning Disability Nurse, tells us what she enjoys about her job.