Celebrating our nurses – Emily Burch

Date: 29 May 2020

Emily Burch

2020 is the International Year of the Nurse and Midwife – a chance for us to shine the light on some of the amazing nurses who make up our diverse workforce.

Here Emily Burch, Clinical Nurse Manager Primary Care and Substance Misuse tells us what she loves about her job.

What inspired you to become a nurse?

My mother was a nurse and watching her as I grew up I was inspired by her capacity to care for others, to be able to not only look at a problem clinically but to also see the human and emotional impact alongside.  I never planned to follow in her footsteps and it wasn’t until I unexpectedly found myself working as a healthcare assistant with dementia patients that I realised I too wanted to care for others and support them often at the most vulnerable time in their lives.

Can you please describe your typical day?

My current role involves leading and managing physical health and substance misuse within specialist services.  I work with a Physical Health and Wellbeing Practitioner and between us we cover over 22 services.  Each day brings a variety of challenges such as the management of clozapine; ensuring patients have access to primary care services such as a dentist, GP, podiatrist and optician; advising and managing referrals to physical health specialists such as diabetic specialist teams; providing training and support to the MDT in physical health and substance misuse; managing patients long-term conditions including  NHS Timeline Screenings; identifying gaps in service provision and providing innovative, creative ways to improve access and care within physical health; working to increase staff and patients understanding around physical health and substance misuse; and audit and service improvement projects such as medication  management, equipment, resus and the deteriorating patient. 

With the current challenges of COVID-19 my typical day has seen some changes.  The need for staff and patients to be supported with physical health and IPC has always been important to promote holistic healing; but upskilling and supporting staff to manage the demands of the pandemic is vital in ensuring the safety of all and to reduce the risk of spreading infection. My day will now include supporting teams with PPE, designing pathways for the management of COVID-19 patients, testing new admissions and symptomatic patients and responding to emergencies.  In fact the need for Physical Health support means we have moved to provide a 7-day a week service.

What is the best part of your job?

It is hard to pick just one aspect of the job that is the best. I truly love being a nurse and the work that I do, but if I was to sum it up, it would be having the ability to make a real change in patients’ lives to ensure we are keeping them at the heart of all we do and the decisions we make.  I enjoy being able to find robust and creative ways to reduce inequalities between mental health and physical health to truly give our patients integrated healthcare.

What would you say to someone considering a career in nursing?

I would tell anyone considering a career in nursing that it is one of the most privileged jobs you could have.  It can be creative, cutting edge, innovative, emotional and inspiring.  Being able to show true compassion and care to those in need is a precious gift and one that will stay with you always.

 

 

 

 

  • Summary:

    2020 is the International Year of the Nurse and Midwife – a chance for us to shine the light on some of the amazing nurses who make up our diverse workforce.

    Here Emily Burch, Clinical Nurse Manager Primary Care and Substance Misuse tells us what she loves about her job.